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By: Javier Stevenson

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Friday, 14-Jun-2013 04:13 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Airshow Photography 2

The front barriers fill up fast, so get there early and claim your spot...spread your wings too, because I guarantee when it gets busy people will attempt to press to the front.



For jet planes then you want a fast shutter speed to capture them sharply as they move fast and you don't have any props etc to worry about blurring.

You might find as I have on a brilliant day that the planes have a tendency to silhouette against the heavens so advice from the forum was supposed to dial in a bit of exposure compensation. I Really do not know in the event you certainly can do it in your camera or not, but again simply play with it.

Also make sure you pan easily and keep panning even after shutter release. Try playing with constant autofocus to help monitor the planes.

Most important will be to enjoy it, its likely one of the tougher issues to photograph, play with the configurations, you are going to miss a lot of shots so in the event you come away with some you are pleased with you have completed good.


* For prop items probably 1/250s
* Anything quick you'll have to look at 1/1000s if there's enough light.
* Don't squint if you'e looking through the viewfinder, keep both eyes open and relaxed, that can make it easier to follow moving targets.
* Jets: Mode: Aperture Priority Aperture: f10 Bracketing: 3f @ 0.3 Exsposure bias: 0.3 (this gives me 3 shots at 0.0 0.3 and 0.7) Focus: AF C (Continuous) Metering: Matrix Props:

Sea Front Airshows OK, just to make you aware, sea front airshows are not the most effective for photography unless you have a 500mm lens. The plane never have a tendency to have that close and display on the water, so alot of little grey dots in the skies. Friend went 2 years back and did not love the photographic experience, lots of individuals and nowhere good to photograph from.

For jets, TV settings between 640 -1000th sec depending on the speed of the jet. These speeds depends on your own lens 70-300mm IS (f5.6) ability to realize this. This can depend on the problem on the day (pray for sun).

Setting your ISO settings to 200 - 400 (sensitivity of detector to light) will help you with the shutter settings without placing too much noise into the pictures.

The main thing is your panning techique, which does take time to master, particularly in the slower shutter speeds. One good thing about air shows is, you get a lot of practice taking images.
http://furtivesynergy203.wordpress.com/2013/06/10/infographic-10-rules-of-photography/



Saturday, 8-Jun-2013 22:05 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Composition in Photography

Composition is what seperates generic point-and - shoot photography from genuine thought and in the pipeline out photography. Without knowing the way to correctly compose a snapshot, you could have a $3,000 camera, but will still be taking mundane photos.

A camera is a tool, with no matter how simple or complicated a tool really is, the efficacy of this tool depends on the operator. For an illustration, let's use one of the simplest tools, a hammer. This hammer has got the ability to drive a nail perfectly straight without bending it o-r smashing your fingers in the procedure, but if you do not know what you are doing, you can get a thumb along with a disfigured nail to boot. That pleasant glazed camera could be outstanding at reproducing your photograph on a digital or movie medium, but you might not be using the camera correctly, or 'hitting the nail on the top' so to speak.

The principal items to consider when composing a picture are your placement, your surroundings, as well as your subject. Before taking a picture, think about, 'What do I want to accomplish with this photo?'. Create a goal or object, plan it out, then make that plan work. There are only two basic methods to do this; position your topics, o-r position your-self.

One good strategy to get a sense of just what a scene would seem like as an actual photograph will be to see the scene through this frame and make a frame from both hands. This effectively gives you a sense of edge, as well as blocks out items which may be otherwise distracting you from the actual scene at hand. Below can be an example of this.

Viewing possible photos by way of a 'hand frame' can give you a great feel for the end result.

Issue
All good pictures start with a topic. Before taking a picture, determine exactly what you need the main topic or point of interest to be. Normally, the photo ought to be studied in a way that makes the subject the very first thing which is seen within the photograph. Your theme should be the principal point of focus and should be crisp and clear. Ideally, there should be nothing in the photograph that attracts more attention compared to the subject it self. If, for example, you had been to photograph a beach scene using a lighthouse as your own subject, and a viewer is more attracted to a sandcastle in the beach, you have done a poor job of making your subject clear.

Clearly, there can be, and numerous times are, multiple subjects in one photograph. In this scenario, the object is to get balance and harmony between all topics. All of these are questions which you have to address, and plan so. When selecting a topic, don't look at the picture as the photographer, look at it as another photographer critiquing your work.


Framing
Frames could be essentially any item that encloses o-r encompasses your subject. This could be branches of nearby trees as well as a solid framework such as a cutout in a wall. Pay attention to your surroundings, and keep a watch out for things that would make for an image-improving 'framework'. Take shape, texture, and colour in to thought, frames which contrast sharply with the subject of your picture will make for amazing pictures. Use frames with attention, as misuse can create cluttered or visually unappealing pictures.


Balance
Getting the appropriate balance between your theme and other aspects of the photo is incredibly important. You do not need other parts of the photograph distracting from your subject. Items that you should pay attention to are contrast, color, size, and symmetry. Broadly speaking, asymmetrical photographs are somewhat more appealing than symmetrical photographs. Putting your subject off center generally has more of an impact and is more pleasant to the eye than having your subject smack dab in the middle, which brings me to the Rule of Thirds


Rule of Thirds T
The Rule of Thirds is actually a photographic composition technique that many if not all complex photographers employ a great deal. The four intersections of those lines are a great guidepoint for where your subject should be centered. In Addition, when photographing people, a great utilization of the rule of thirds in lots of circumstances would be to line a person's body up with a vertical line, and line their eyes up with a horizontal line. This really is probably one of the very most impor-tant compositional methods, as many photographers believe that a centered theme is really not as interesting (in many situations).

It really is, however, recommended that you treat this 'rule' as more of a guideline though, as there are lots of circumstances where a much more attractive picture might be created without the employment of this rule. The rule of thirds goes all the way back once again to 1845, where it originated as a rule for composing scenic visuals.






Colour and Contrast
A subject that's light will have a lot more impact when placed against a dark background, but a dark subject against a light background could be distracting. As there are so many different situations which have different applications of this, the only means to obtain a feel for colors and contrast would be to see it firsthand.




Positioning
For those who have good accessibility to the location, you may need to consider having the shot from a totally different angle. In still life shots, placing the subject can also work wonders.


Lines
Lines and edges of all types may be worked in-to a photograph to raise the effect. Diagonal lines are lovely and visually pleasing and may have a large effect on your own photograph. Parallel lines and repeating lines can also have exquisite effects. Lines that are leading to an object are usually more appealing in the event you get that object in the shot.



For example, if you're photographing a field enclosed by way of a wooden fence with horizontal lines, you might want to attempt to get a number of of the fence posts the lines lead to within the shot.


Saturday, 8-Jun-2013 21:18 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Ideas for begining photography

As a brand new photographer, these are just some of the thoughts that have helped get me going. Update: Also check out our Digital Photography Tips for Beginners Page.

1. Don't go crazy buying the most high-priced equipment immediately.
It's possible to get really fine photos with a cheap point and shoot. See these examples on Flickr. The more pictures you shoot, the further you'll know by what type of camera to get when it is time to update.

2. Consider a tripod.
In the flip side, an inexpensive tripod is worth getting, particularly in the event that you have shaky hands like mine. For much more solidity, use your camera's timer function with a tripod (read our introduction to tripods).

3. Keep your camera with you all the time.
Photo ops often come when you least expect it. If you can keep your gear relatively simple - - only a small camera-bag and a tripod - - you might have the ability to make the most of some of those unexpected opportunities.




4. Make a list of shots you had wished to get.
For those times you cannot carry your camera around, keep a little laptop to write down places you had like to return and photograph. Make sure to notice any significant details, like the lighting, in order to come back at precisely the same time of day or when the current weather's appropriate. If you do not want to carry a notebook, send your-self an email using your mobile phone with Jott.com.

5. Don't overlook ordinary subjects for photography.
You could catch an interesting trick of the mild or find some unanticipated wildflowers in your yard. Often a simple theme makes the best shot.

6. Enjoy the learning process.
The best thing of getting a hobby like photography is never running out of things-to discover. Inspiration is all around you. Look at everything with the eyes of a photographer and also you'll find opportunities you never found before.

7.
Browse through Flickr or sites such as the Digital Photography School Forum for inspiration and tips. If you are interested in learning about postprocessing, give free software such as the GIMP a try.

8.
Than you know your point and shoot might be more flexible and powerful. See the guide for help deciphering all those little symbols. Try shooting your subjects with several settings to learn what effects you enjoy, as you explore. When you're looking at your photographs on a pc, you can check the EXIF information (usually within the file's properties) to remember the settings you used.

9. Study the basic rules.
The number of information about photography online can be overwhelming. Start with a few articles on composition. Be ready to accept what more experienced photographers need to say about technique. You must understand the rules before you can break them.

10. Take photos frequently.
Ensure you remember to practice frequently, so you do not forget what you've learned, if you can not do that. An outstanding way to stimulate yourself is by performing the weekly assignments in the DPS Forum.

11. Do not be afraid to test.
If you're using a digital camera, the price of errors is free. Go insane -- you might wind up with something you enjoy. You'll surely learn a great deal in-the process.


Saturday, 8-Jun-2013 21:17 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Ideas for begining photography

As a brand new photographer, these are just some of the thoughts that have helped get me going. Update: Also check out our Digital Photography Tips for Beginners Page.

1. Don't go crazy buying the most high-priced equipment immediately.
It's possible to get really fine photos with a cheap point and shoot. See these examples on Flickr. The more pictures you shoot, the further you'll know by what type of camera to get when it is time to update.

2. Consider a tripod.
In the flip side, an inexpensive tripod is worth getting, particularly in the event that you have shaky hands like mine. For much more solidity, use your camera's timer function with a tripod (read our introduction to tripods).

3. Keep your camera with you all the time.
Photo ops often come when you least expect it. If you can keep your gear relatively simple - - only a small camera-bag and a tripod - - you might have the ability to make the most of some of those unexpected opportunities.


4. Make a list of shots you had wished to get.
For those times you cannot carry your camera around, keep a little laptop to write down places you had like to return and photograph. Make sure to notice any significant details, like the lighting, in order to come back at precisely the same time of day or when the current weather's appropriate. If you do not want to carry a notebook, send your-self an email using your mobile phone with Jott.com.

5. Don't overlook ordinary subjects for photography.
You could catch an interesting trick of the mild or find some unanticipated wildflowers in your yard. Often a simple theme makes the best shot.

6. Enjoy the learning process.
The best thing of getting a hobby like photography is never running out of things-to discover. Inspiration is all around you. Look at everything with the eyes of a photographer and also you'll find opportunities you never found before.

7.
Browse through Flickr or sites such as the Digital Photography School Forum for inspiration and tips. If you are interested in learning about postprocessing, give free software such as the GIMP a try.

8.




Than you know your point and shoot might be more flexible and powerful. See the guide for help deciphering all those little symbols. Try shooting your subjects with several settings to learn what effects you enjoy, as you explore. When you're looking at your photographs on a pc, you can check the EXIF information (usually within the file's properties) to remember the settings you used.



9. Study the basic rules.
The number of information about photography online can be overwhelming. Start with a few articles on composition. Be ready to accept what more experienced photographers need to say about technique. You must understand the rules before you can break them.

10. Take photos frequently.
Ensure you remember to practice frequently, so you do not forget what you've learned, if you can not do that. An outstanding way to stimulate yourself is by performing the weekly assignments in the DPS Forum.

11. Do not be afraid to test.
If you're using a digital camera, the price of errors is free. Go insane -- you might wind up with something you enjoy. You'll surely learn a great deal in-the process.


Saturday, 8-Jun-2013 21:17 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Ideas for begining photography

As a brand new photographer, these are just some of the thoughts that have helped get me going. Update: Also check out our Digital Photography Tips for Beginners Page.

1. Don't go crazy buying the most high-priced equipment immediately.
It's possible to get really fine photos with a cheap point and shoot. See these examples on Flickr. The more pictures you shoot, the further you'll know by what type of camera to get when it is time to update.

2. Consider a tripod.
In the flip side, an inexpensive tripod is worth getting, particularly in the event that you have shaky hands like mine. For much more solidity, use your camera's timer function with a tripod (read our introduction to tripods).

3. Keep your camera with you all the time.
Photo ops often come when you least expect it. If you can keep your gear relatively simple - - only a small camera-bag and a tripod - - you might have the ability to make the most of some of those unexpected opportunities.


4. Make a list of shots you had wished to get.
For those times you cannot carry your camera around, keep a little laptop to write down places you had like to return and photograph. Make sure to notice any significant details, like the lighting, in order to come back at precisely the same time of day or when the current weather's appropriate. If you do not want to carry a notebook, send your-self an email using your mobile phone with Jott.com.

5. Don't overlook ordinary subjects for photography.
You could catch an interesting trick of the mild or find some unanticipated wildflowers in your yard. Often a simple theme makes the best shot.



6. Enjoy the learning process.
The best thing of getting a hobby like photography is never running out of things-to discover. Inspiration is all around you. Look at everything with the eyes of a photographer and also you'll find opportunities you never found before.

7.
Browse through Flickr or sites such as the Digital Photography School Forum for inspiration and tips. If you are interested in learning about postprocessing, give free software such as the GIMP a try.

8.
Than you know your point and shoot might be more flexible and powerful. See the guide for help deciphering all those little symbols. Try shooting your subjects with several settings to learn what effects you enjoy, as you explore. When you're looking at your photographs on a pc, you can check the EXIF information (usually within the file's properties) to remember the settings you used.



9. Study the basic rules.
The number of information about photography online can be overwhelming. Start with a few articles on composition. Be ready to accept what more experienced photographers need to say about technique. You must understand the rules before you can break them.

10. Take photos frequently.
Ensure you remember to practice frequently, so you do not forget what you've learned, if you can not do that. An outstanding way to stimulate yourself is by performing the weekly assignments in the DPS Forum.

11. Do not be afraid to test.
If you're using a digital camera, the price of errors is free. Go insane -- you might wind up with something you enjoy. You'll surely learn a great deal in-the process.


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